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Lokalhistorie

Lokalhistorie består av fantastiske historier og kunnskap om Norge og en rekke andre land, som inneholder alt fra norske forbrytelser til lokale gater og smug som vi alle har besøkt. Det er vanligvis til utlandet folk reiser, men hvis du vil reise rundt i Norge og se noen av de skjulte opplevelsene vi har i landet vårt, for eksempel i Oslo, Bergen eller Trondheim, har vi en stor samling guider for det. Lokalhistorie er for deg som vil lære mer om skjønnheten i Norges landskap og dets historier. Her kan du finne inspirasjon til den gode middagspraten eller til den alltid så etterlengtede sommerturen.
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  • av David Long
    150,-

    From the world's oldest indoor loo to a theatre where spectators fill their pockets with poo, the definitive guide to the stranger side of Scotland shows there's a lot more to the place than tartan, haggis and tossing the caber. Inside you'll find: The world's longest man-made echo A city where aliens are welcome What the Royals really think of it Britain's weirdest wig The worst Scottish accents ever Our tallest hedge and oldest tree Loch monsters nastier than Nessie A road you can roll up Scots in Space Whether it's Ruthven or Ruthven? Britain's loneliest bus stop (and its loveliest) A school for spies The cost of burning witches An aeroplane made from seaweed . . . and why the Queen needs rubber glovesPraise for Bizarre London: 'In a market niche that's now as crowded as the 18:22 to Reading, Bizarre London pummels its bantamweight rivals with knockout clouts of trivia that even this weary correspondent hadn't encountered before.' The Londonist

  • av Various
    183,-

    The best tales from around the country, chosen from our popular series of Folk Tales

  • av The History Press
    154,-

    Featuring a range of picturesque vistas, from freshwater lochs and wooded glens to majestic mountains, granite cities and medieval castles, each stunning scene is full of intriguing detail sure to fire the imagination and make you reach for yourcolouring pencils.

  • - A Church and its People, 1872-2022
    av Christopher Kitching
    265,-

    St Mary's is a vibrant London church on the northern edge of Primrose Hill. It is widely known for its fine liturgy and music in the Anglican tradition, its affirmation of women's ministry, and its pioneering youthwork and social outreach.

  • - The Gibson Family of Scilly
    av Carl Douglas & Bjoern Hagberg
    364,-

  • - Postcards from Ireland Past
    av Paul Kelly
    225,-

    An uplifting, nostalgic look at Ireland through the eyes of an icon of Irish photography.

  • av David Robertson, Susanna Wade Martins & Peter Wade-Martins
    233,-

    Norfolk's first purpose-written guidebook to the county's key archaeological sites and historic buildings

  • - A Financial History of Edinburgh
    av Ray Perman
    181 - 295,-

  • - Designing for Inclusion in Lindsay's New York
    av Mariana Mogilevich
    350 - 1 287,-

    "The interplay of psychology, design, and politics in experiments with urban open space"--

  • av Mark Amies
    193,-

    A fascinating insight, derived from a regular feature on the Robert Elms show, into some of the forgotten industries of London, lavishly illustrated throughout.

  • - How a Small Scottish Village Changed History
    av Andrew C. Scott
    228,-

    The incredible story of how the village of Lesmahagow has influenced the world in a variety of fields, from industry to espionage, throughout history.

  • av Adam Nicolson
    167,-

    A fascinating account from award-winning author, Adam Nicolson, on the history of Nicolson's own national treasure, his family home: Sissinghurst.Sissinghurst is world famous as a place of calm and beauty, a garden slipped into the ruins of a rose-pink Elizabethan palace. But is it entirely what its creators intended? Has its success over the last thirty years come at a price? Is Sissinghurst everything it could be?The story of this piece of land, an estate in the Weald of Kent, is told here for the first time from the very beginning. Adam Nicolson, who now lives there, has uncovered remarkable new findings about its history as a medieval manor and great sixteenth-century house, from the days of its decline as an eighteenth-century prison to a flourishing Victorian farm and on to the creation, by his grandparents Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson, of a garden in a weed-strewn wreck.Alongside his recovery of the past, Adam Nicolson wanted something else: for the land at Sissinghurst to live again, to become the landscape of orchards, cattle, fruit and sheep he remembered from his boyhood. Could that living frame of a mixed farm be brought back to what had turned into monochrome fields of chemicalised wheat and oilseed rape? Against the odds, he was going to try.Adam Nicolson has always been a passionate writer about landscape and buildings, but this is different. This is the place he wanted to make good again, reconnecting garden, farm and land. More than just a personal biography of a place, this book is the story of taking an inheritance and steering it in a new direction, just as an entrepreneur might take hold of a company, or just as all of us might want to take our dreams and make them real.

  • av Doreen McBride
    173,-

    Animal tales full of folklore and magic, chosen for for children aged 7-11

  • av Phoebe Clapham
    184,-

    A completely new Trail Guide dedicated to the London section of the Thames Path from Hampton Court to the Thames Barrier.

  • av Billy F.K. Howorth
    184,-

    Beautiful collection of old postcards showing the Lake District's enduring appeal over the last century and more.

  • - Lawrence MacEwen and the Isle of Muck
    av Polly Pullar
    154,-

    The story of Muck as told through the eyes of Lawrence MacEwen, working farmer and much-loved laird.

  • av Paul Howard Lang
    192,-

    Hanwell and Southall both have surprisingly interesting historical associations. The adjoining Middlesex parishes are linked by the Uxbridge Road, formerly the Oxford Road, which was connected to London. Hanwell and Southall were both reliant on agriculture right up to the end of the Victorian period. It was during the Edwardian era, and particularly after the First World War, that Southall began to change to an industrial district - greatly facilitated by the good transport links such as the canal and railway networks. Hanwell never industrialised to the same extent as Southall, and remains far more suburban in character to this day. Hanwell is linked in the popular imagination with Charlie Chaplin, who went to school at the Central London District School. Contrasting images of the school as it was and how it now appears are shown in this book. Southall has the distinction of having the oldest manor house in Greater London - dating from the sixteenth century and restored. The Middlesex County Asylum, dating to 1831, was also in the Southall parish. The building still remains and is currently undergoing restoration. The importance of the railways and the local connection with Isambard Kingdom Brunel is dealt with, as well as the importance of the Grand Junction Canal in speeding the growth of industry in the Southall area. Hanwell amalgamated with Ealing in 1926 and Southall in 1965, but they still retain their own identities in the present day, as they did a hundred years ago.

  • av David Muggleton
    193,-

    Brighton has long been an important seaside town, and today draws in visitors from all over Britain and beyond for its varied nightlife, rich history and attractive waterfront. In 1800, Brighton had forty-one inns and taverns, and by 1860 there were well over 450, echoing the town's growth in popularity through the Regency and early Victorian eras. A recent resurgence of interest in real ale has also seen a welcome boom in micro-breweries, placing Brighton firmly on the beer-lover's map. David Muggleton takes us on a tour of these watering holes, including the long-established venerable Greyhound, elegant Regency Cricketers, high-Victorian Colonnade, elaborate mock-Tudor King & Queen and the English Renaissance revivalist Good Companions, the pub reputed to have opened on the very day that the Second World War began. Brimming with quirky tales and fascinating facts, this carefully crafted guide initiates readers into the fascinating history of Brighton's pubs.

  • av Jean & John Bradburn
    193,-

    Widnes is an industrial town within the borough of Halton, in the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England, with an urban area population of 57,663 in 2004. It is located on the northern bank of the River Mersey where the estuary narrows to form Runcorn Gap. Directly to the south of Widnes across the Mersey is the town of Runcorn. Upstream and 8 miles to the east of Widnes is the town of Warrington, and downstream 16 miles to the west is the city of Liverpool. Historically part of Lancashire, prior to the Industrial Revolution Widnes consisted of a small number of separate settlements on land which was mainly marsh or moorland. In 1847 the first chemical factory was established and the town rapidly became a major centre of the chemical industry. Widnes continues to be a major manufacturer of chemicals and there has been a degree of diversification of the town's industries. Widnes lies on the southern route of the Liverpool to Manchester railway line. The Sankey Canal (now disused) terminates in an area of Widnes known as Spike Island.

  • - The First Kings of Anfield
    av Mark Metcalf
    167,-

    As one of the twelve founding Football League clubs in 1888/89, Everton Football Club has a long, proud history. Having played more top-flight League games than any other English team, the Toffees have won the League championship nine times - the fourth best record of any team. The first occasion was in the third season of League football, 1890/91 when the Blues became the first club from Liverpool to collect the League championship trophy from their then base, Anfield. In achieving their success, Everton knocked the winners of the first two championships, the Invincibles of Preston North End, off their throne. But how did they do it? Who were the players in this momentous season, what sort of football did they play and who did they beat?

  • - A Celebration of the Capital's Music History
    av Jim Byers, Jonathan Trew, Fiona Shepherd & m.fl.
    153,-

  • av Paul Kelly
    250,-

    Return to Sender pairs pioneering colour photographer John Hinde's instantly recognisable iconic postcards from Ireland in the 1950s, '60s and '70s, with corresponding contemporary photographs. The side-by-side contrast of these wonderfully captured by photographer Paul Kelly, illustrates the ways Ireland's landscapes have changed over the decades

  • - Where Time Has Stopped
    av Richard Happer
    205,-

    Ghost towns, empty streets, crumbling ruins and lost empires this book reveals these and other deserted places. Many places featured were once populated and now sit unoccupied, modern day ruins, sitting in decay.

  • - A Historical Guide
    av David Caldwell
    154,-

    Mull and Iona are two of the most visited islands in Scotland, and have played a central role in the history of the country.

  • - 200 Years of History in the Railway Lands
    av Peter Darley
    254,-

    How King's Cross grew from tile kilns and dust heaps to a vital rail artery, and from decay and dereliction to a site of major redevelopment

  • av David Ramshaw
    154,-

    Full of information which will make you say, `I never knew that!'

  • av The History Press
    154,-

    Featuring a range of vistas, from picturesque towns and villages to historic castles and stately homes , each stunning scene is full of intriguing detail sure to fire the imagination and make you reach for your colouring pencils.

  • av Vaughan Grylls
    188,-

    Fascinating vintage photos of Hong Kong have been matched with the same viewpoint today to show the amazing growth and development of this unique city.

  • av National Geographic
    211,-

    For avid outdoor fans, Canada's 47 national parks are beautifully showcased in this new edition of the official guidebook, updated for the country's 150th birthday

  • av Peter and Oriel Caine
    188,-

    Vintage Parisian scenes from the time of the Belle Epoque and beyond are matched with the same views today to give a fascinating insight into the romantic capital of Europe in this bilingual edition.

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